• Iowa DNR Hunting Regs and Chart Corrections

    August 6, 2020

    A printing issue in the chart on the bottom of p. 6 of the 2020-21 Iowa Hunting, Trapping and Migratory Game Bird regulations, inadvertently omitted check marks indicating which licenses and fees are required for each type of hunter and each type of license.

    The online version of the regulations is correct. Find all your Hunting and Trapping regulations here:

    https://www.iowadnr.gov/Hunting/Hunting-Licenses-Laws?utm_medium=email&utm_source=govdelivery

  • NSSF Witness to President Trump Signing Great American Outdoors Act into Law

    August 4, 2020

    NEWTOWN, Conn. – NSSF®, the trade association for the firearm industry, was honored to be present at the White House as President Donald Trump signed into law the Great American Outdoors Act, H.R. 1957. This historic federal law is among the most meaningful legislative measures for sportsmen conservationists ever.

    “This is a proud moment for the firearm industry which supported this legislation to see it passed into law by the Trump administration which has kept the promise that public lands and waters belong to all of America’s sportsmen and women,” said Joe Bartozzi, NSSF President and Chief Executive Officer. “The Great American Outdoors Act is bold in its scope and historic in the guarantee that public lands and waters will be accessible to America’s conservation-minded hunters and recreational target shooters. Outdoorsmen and women are the greatest stewards of our natural resources of wildlife, natural habitats and conservation-minded traditions that pass along the benefit of the preservation of public lands access for all. This law enables current and future generations of Americans to enjoy and preserve our national outdoor heritage.”

    The Great American Outdoors Act delivers on the promise of sustained wildlife conservation, public land hunting and recreational shooting for current and future generations of outdoorsmen and women. The law was conceived with bipartisan support and ensures full, dedicated funding for the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF). It addresses the maintenance backlog of public lands and water projects across the United States. Those projects include wildlife habitat conservation, road and trail repairs and increased recreational access to our public lands and waters.

    About NSSF
    NSSF is the trade association for the firearm industry. Its mission is to promote, protect and preserve hunting and the shooting sports. Formed in 1961, NSSF has a membership of thousands of manufacturers, distributors, firearms retailers, shooting ranges, sportsmen’s organizations and publishers nationwide. For more information, log on to www.nssf.org.

  • Counties, Cities, Preemption, and Clarity…

    August 3, 2020

    Below is a letter sent by our Board Member, Richard Rogers to a member of the Johnson County Board of Supervisors in response to his public blog post. Please read and absorb:

    Please allow me to introduce myself. I am a Board Member and the volunteer lobbyist for Iowa Firearms Coalition (IFC). Our grassroots organization has been deeply involved in helping craft and advance legislation over the last decade that has sought to return to Iowa law respect for and protection of those natural and fundamental rights guaranteed by the Second Amendment to the Constitution of the United States.

    This morning, one of your constituents who is a member of our organization contacted us and raised concerns about the “Guns in County Buildings” segment of your recent blog post. His concern was largely that Johnson County might consider suing the state over Iowa Code 724.28, which preempts the regulation of weapons to the state.

    I am writing to you for a different reason, however. Your post (specifically the excerpt pasted below) indicated an important misunderstanding of this longstanding Iowa law and the recent amendments to it. Unfortunately, it appears from news reports that this misunderstanding is widely shared by government officials and journalists. You stated:

    “In the 2020 Legislative Session a bill was passed (HF2502) that dramatically changed the amount of local control regarding guns. Previously, cities and counties could create local ordinances to govern whether or not firearms were allowed in municipal buildings. As of July 1, that power went away.

    There is even more at stake here. The new law expressly creates an easy course of civil action for people with weapons who were denied access to a public building.”

    That first paragraph is completely wrong. HF2502 most certainly did not “dramatically change the amount of local control regarding guns.” Rather, it widened the preexisting area of preemption to include “all other weapons” and firearms modifications and attachments. You next stated, “Previously, cities and counties could create local ordinances to govern whether or not firearms were allowed in municipal buildings.” In fact, such local ordinances have been specifically against the law (Iowa Code 724.28) since April 5, 1990! That law has simply been too often ignored. Since 1990, the legislature has made several efforts to emphasize the preemption of firearms regulation to the state. In 2010, the General Assembly decreed [Iowa Code 724.7(1)] that Iowa Permits to Carry Weapons are “valid throughout the state except where the carrying or possession of firearms is prohibited by state or federal law.” In 2017, the legislature added this new section [724.28(3)], which gave persons adversely affected by illegal local firearms regulations legal standing to sue:

    “If a political subdivision of the state, prior to, on, or after July 1, 2017, adopts, makes, enacts, or amends any ordinance, measure, enactment, rule, resolution, motion, or policy regulating the ownership, possession, legal transfer, lawful transportation, registration, or licensing of firearms when the ownership, possession, transfer, transportation, registration, or license is otherwise lawful under the laws of this state, a person adversely affected by the ordinance, measure, enactment, rule, resolution, motion, or policy may file suit in the appropriate court for declaratory and injunctive relief for damages.”

    You incorrectly stated “The new law expressly creates an easy course of civil action for people with weapons who were denied access to a public building.” That “easy course of civil action” for relief and damages has been available since July 1, 2017. The amendments to the law this year do now allow for the prevailing party in such a suit to also receive attorney fees and court costs.

    Both the letter of the law and the record of legislative debate on these matters since 1990 make clear that the Iowa General Assembly intends to retain full authority over the regulation of weapons in this state and to prohibit the creation of an unworkable patchwork of local regulations. IFC takes the recent enactment of HF2502 as a statement by the legislature that “We really, really mean it!”

    You noted that there now exists an “out” for local governments that believe they have a real and economically justified need for actual security at a particular public venue. Specifically, Iowa Code 724.28(4) has been added:

    “A political subdivision of the state may restrict the carrying, possession, or transportation of firearms or other dangerous weapons in the buildings or physical structures located on property under the political subdivision’s control if adequate arrangements are made by the political subdivision to screen persons for firearms or other dangerous weapons and the political subdivision provides armed security personnel inside the building or physical structure where the restriction is to be in effect.”

    You may be surprised to learn that this new provision was only included because IFC originated the idea and advocated for it over a period of several years, despite opposition from some legislators and members of our own organization. We recognized that some circumstances may support the establishment of real security measures. For example, some government-owned entertainment venues, such as Wells Fargo Arena in Des Moines, face contractual security obligations and would suffer economic hardship if they could not legally fulfill them. With the exception of a few county courthouses, there has been almost no real effort by local governments to actually secure the facilities in which they have attempted to “ban” firearms. Instead, they have merely implemented “No Weapons” policies (void under Iowa Code 724.28) and put up signs. While signs are inexpensive, such efforts provide zero real security and are actually counterproductive, in that only law-abiding citizens obey them and voluntarily disarm, while those who harbor evil intent or are mentally disturbed pay them no heed whatsoever. The reality is that actual security cannot be attained without effort and cost. If government intends to deprive citizens of any effective means of self-defense, then it must assume the burden of instituting real security measures.

    If Iowa’s local elected officials expect residents and visitors to abide by their laws, must they not lead by example and follow state law? It is IFC’s intent to see that they do and that Iowans may freely exercise their natural and fundamental right to keep and bear arms in defense of themselves, their families, and their communities.

    I would welcome the opportunity to converse with you on this topic. If I can be of assistance to you in this or any other matter, please feel free to contact me at any time.

    Sincerely,

    Richard S. Rogers
    Board Member, Iowa Firearms Coalition

  • #winning – NO GUNS Stickers Come Down all over Iowa!

    July 7, 2020

    Brandon Talsma, R, Jasper County (Iowa), Board of Supervisors, peels off the false sense of security plaguing the local courthouse after the Iowa Firearms Coalition and our allies in the NRA celebrated a great victory in our years-long battle to prevent an unworkable patchwork of weapons regulations across our state. Iowans deserve – and have been insisting upon –minimal, uniform and understandable regulation throughout the state. Without that uniformity, it becomes impractical and perhaps even impossible for law-abiding citizens to travel outside – or even within – their own community while possessing or carrying a defensive weapon. We have long fought to protect and enhance Iowa’s “preemption” statute, Iowa Code 724.28, which was enacted in April 1990, but which has been widely and openly ignored.

    HF2502 is a bill for an act relating to firearms and weapons, including the storage, carrying, possession, or transportation of weapons and the establishment, use, and maintenance of shooting ranges. This bill passed the House 52-44 in a party-line vote on February 27. It passed 32-17 in a party-line vote on June 3rd in the Senate. The bill was signed by the Governor and effective on July 1.

    Details of the bill:
    -Shooting Range Protection Provides that cities and counties may not apply and enforce arbitrary regulations and restrictions upon those seeking to establish, use, or maintain an existing shooting range or to improve an existing range. Conditions may not be imposed beyond the requirements of standard zoning and of state law.
    -Protection of “Courthouse Carry” from Judicial Overreach Provides that a court order prohibiting the lawful carrying, possession, or transportation of a weapon in a county courthouse or other joint-use public facility shall be unenforceable unless the judicial order applies only to a courtroom or a court office, or to a courthouse used only for judicial branch functions.
    -Prohibition of Weapons Regulation by Local Governments
    -Amends Iowa Code 724.28 to make absolutely clear that only the Iowa Legislature may regulate the ownership, possession, legal transfer, lawful transportation, modification, registration, or licensing of firearms, firearms attachments, or other weapons. (Underlined words are new. The statute previously applied only to firearms.)

    In addition:
    -Local governments may not enact an ordinance, motion, resolution, policy, or amendment to such effect. Such measures are void after July 1, 2020. This will include, for instance, library and park “rules of conduct”.
    -A person adversely affected by the ordinance, measure, enactment, rule, resolution, motion, or policy may file suit in the appropriate court for declaratory and injunctive relief for damages and all damages attributable to the violation. A court shall also award the prevailing party in any such lawsuit reasonable attorney fees and court costs. (Underlined language is new.)
    -Local governments may not regulate the storage of weapons or ammunition. (Exception allowed for storage rules applied to manufacture/distribution of explosive materials.)
    -The bill provides a limited exception to the prohibition on the carrying, possession, or transportation of firearms or other dangerous weapons in the buildings or physical structures located on property under the political subdivision’s control if adequate arrangements are made by the political subdivision to screen persons for firearms or other dangerous weapons and the political subdivision provides armed security personnel inside the building or physical structure where the restriction is to be in effect.

  • Might doesn’t make Right…

    July 4, 2020

    As an advocacy group with a great track record of achieving change in law and policy, we can tell you that success comes only with tremendous effort and diligence. While we may have disagreed with and chaffed under the many laws we have sought to change, we obeyed them all and expected our members, allies and others to adhere to them as well.

    For anyone wishing to make a change to a law, a policy, or even a monument, there are lawful and proper means available to all. Might doesn’t make right. No individual, nor any mob, can be allowed to force their will upon others through violence or the threat of violence.

    Iowa Firearms Coalition restricts our advocacy to a narrow range of issues – Second Amendment rights, matters of self-defense and use of force, hunting regulations, and the like. We do not take positions on political or cultural issues outside these areas and we are not doing so now. But we believe strongly in maximizing individual liberty within a framework of representative and constitutionally limited government. Because we value the rights of the minority so highly (an individual, after all, may sometimes be a minority of one), we insist upon respect for and adherence to the rule of law. The mob, even if it consists of a majority, must never be allowed to trample the rights of others. History shows that path too often leads from rejecting traditions, to tearing down icons, to subjugation, suffering, and even mass murder. That must never be allowed to happen in America. As America celebrates her 244th birthday, IFC will fight to see that it does not.

    In Liberty,


    Dave Funk – President
    Michael Ware – Board Chairman

  • HF2502 signed by Governor along with the legislative history!

    June 27, 2020

    Great news! HF2502, the number one legislative priority for both IFC and NRA in this year’s legislative session, was among the thirty-one bills signed on Thursday, June 25 by Governor Reynolds. This important new law will become effective next Wednesday, July 1, 2020.

    Since the enactment of HF2502 marks the completion of IFC’s legislative efforts for the 88th General Assembly (2019/2020), this is a good time to look back at the achievements and disappointments that we have experienced during this very unusual year.

    First, let’s look back at the first session of the current General Assembly in 2019. IFC’s top priority was the passage of a Joint Resolution to adopt the Freedom Amendment, which will put strong protections for the Right to Keep and Bear Arms into Iowa’s Constitution. We won that battle, though the Resolution must be passed again in the next General Assembly in order to then be put to a vote of the people of Iowa.

    IFC’s second priority last year was the Family Defense Act. That bill would have enabled Iowans to lawfully carry their defensive firearms in the parking lots and driveways of public schools, protected them from being fired for safely storing firearms or ammunition in their private vehicles in employer provided parking, strengthened Iowa’s law prohibiting local governments from regulating firearms, and dealt with the overreach of Iowa’s courts in demanding that counties post laughably impotent “No Guns” signs on non-court areas of every courthouse. Unfortunately, due to fear and misunderstanding (largely as a result of the media and Michael “Nanny” Bloomberg’s well-funded minions), the Family Defense Act was not taken up for debate by the House. It was opposed strongly by those controlling the Democrat caucus and no Democrat was willing to vote for the bill. Under the political circumstances, the slim Republican majority (one member of which defected to the Democrat Party late in the session), was unwilling to risk a vote on what would be portrayed as a “Guns at School!” bill. The good news last year was that, for the first time, a bill dealing with these important but sensitive issues passed intact through the committee process in the House. The “school parking lot carry” and “employer parking lots” aspects were taken up separately by the Senate and were also approved by committees and eligible for floor debate. (Since they would obviously not be considered by the House at that point, the Senate did not take those bills up for debate.) IFC celebrated our victories, acknowledged our losses, and continued to strategize with legislative allies in preparation for the next session.

    As the 88th General Assembly reconvened in January of this year, no one could have predicted the events that would soon envelop us. Most anticipated a typical election year session, with the majorities defending their record as “progress” and the minority attacking it as “insufficient” at best and “wrong-headed failure” for the most part. It was expected that Iowa’s election results would largely be reflective of the national electorate’s view of the economy during the summer and fall. IFC’s members and allies naturally wondered if Second Amendment issues would continue to be pushed to the back burner, as the majority sought to attract those elusive “middle of the road” voters, who are alleged to be skeptical of us and receptive to so-called “common sense regulation of guns”. So, we started the legislative session with lowered expectations, but resolved that we would remain fully engaged in the fight for each and every one of our priority issues. We would not grant our friends a pass, nor certainly our adversaries.

    In the House – our area of greatest concern, due to the narrow split between parties – we were very pleased when our number one priority bill, HF2502, moved fairly rapidly through the committee process. The bill incorporates fully half of the provisions of our 2019 Family Defense Act and with strengthened language. Rep. Steven Holt (R- Crawford) was outstanding in his support of the bill in the Public Safety Committee and later as its floor manager during the House debate. The bill passed the House 52-44 on February 27. House Majority Leader Matt Windschitl delivered the vote of every Republican. Unfortunately, not a single Democrat Representative was willing to cross their leadership and vote for the bill.

    HF2502 moved to the Senate, where Sen. Jason Schultz (R-Crawford) guided it quickly through sub-committee and the Senate Judiciary Committee. That Committee’s vote to recommend passage on March 9 meant that the bill was ready for debate by the full Senate. IFC was confident it would be approved and sent to the Governor. Unfortunately, our excitement proved to be premature.

    Suddenly, Iowa and the nation were rocked by the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. The legislature suspended work and recessed on March 17 for an indefinite period. It was immediately apparent that though the legislature would eventually reconvene briefly to conclude the session, the severity of the shock to Iowa’s economy and to the state’s budget would completely overshadow concerns about various “policy” bills that had been under consideration in March. Were HF2502 and our other remaining bills now dead – or merely on life support?

    They say every cloud has a silver lining. As horrible as the pandemic’s disruption of normal life and our expectations has been – disruption that is now being supercharged by significant violence throughout our nation – it has brought clarity to many Americans that may benefit our cause of Liberty. Those of us who have long been in the trenches in support of those rights guaranteed by the Second Amendment understand that we – every individual – are ultimately responsible for providing for the safety and security of self and family. We may find it necessary to be our own “first responders”. A great number of formerly comfortable and complacent Americans have now been forced to the same realization. Reality can bite anyone and it is best to be prepared!

    When the lockdowns started in Iowa, local governments curtailed their operations and generally closed their buildings to the public. As a consequence, many Sheriffs announced that they would no longer process applications for weapons permits for the duration of the emergency. This was due to practical considerations and not any basic objection to issuing permits. However, the law expressly requires Sheriffs to receive and process such applications and doesn’t allow them to push a pause button. Immediately upon first learning of such an announcement, IFC launched into action. An appeal was made to our legislative allies and to the Office of the Governor and within days Governor Reynolds had issued orders requiring Sheriffs to continue processing permit applications and allowing for exceptions to the statutory requirement that some applications be presented in person. At the time, probably no one anticipated how important this would prove to be, but gun dealers soon found themselves swamped with first time buyers looking for defensive firearms. Since Iowa requires a Permit to Acquire Pistols and Revolvers for any transfer of a handgun, a halt to the issuance of those permits would have blocked countless Iowans from legally exercising their Second Amendment rights.

    At the same time, numerous other states and localities were halting the issuance of permits, forcing the closure of firearms dealers, and even banning the transfer, carrying, or public possession of firearms entirely. (Thanks to the Emergency Powers provisions of the Omnibus Gun Bill championed by IFC in 2017, such emergency actions are prohibited under Iowa law.) People who had never thought they might need a gun – or who even actively disliked them – now found it quite difficult or impossible to obtain one. The innumerable gun laws that they had accepted or actively endorsed turned out to be based on nonsense, rather than common sense. This belated rush to the gun stores has only accelerated in recent weeks amid overheating political rhetoric and the rapid spread of actual violence. Many Americans have had their eyes opened to the real value of the Second Amendment.

    When the legislature reconvened on June 3, they did indeed focus on budget matters. But there was also a heightened realization that Second Amendment rights are of great importance to Iowans in the reality of their daily lives, not just as political theory. The Senate quickly took up and passed HF2502 and sent it to the Governor. As expected, she has now signed it and its provisions are effective as of July 1.

    The Senate also approved HF716, a bill passed by the House in 2019. That bill on firearms requirements for deer hunting is the culmination of three years of discussion, cooperation, and negotiation, among IFC, NRA, the Natural Resources Commission, the Dept. of Natural Resources, and legislators. More on the bill below…

    Finally, on June 1, the Governor signed SF537 into law. This bill was sponsored by Senator Jason Schultz and supported by IFC. It allows for the hunting of coyotes with the use of a weapon mounted infrared light source.

    *****

    Now that you have the back story, let’s take a look at what will change in Iowa law on July 1.

    HF2502 contains the following provisions:

    Prohibition of Weapons Regulation by Local Governments

    Amends Iowa Code 724.28 to make absolutely clear that only the Iowa Legislature may regulate the ownership, possession, legal transfer, lawful transportation, modification, registration, or licensing of firearms, firearms attachments, or other weapons. (Underlined words are new. The statute previously applied only to firearms.)

    In addition:

    • Local governments may not enact an ordinance, motion, resolution, policy, or amendment to such effect. Such measures are void after July 1, 2020. This will include, for instance, library and park “rules of conduct”.
    • A person adversely affected by the ordinance, measure, enactment, rule, resolution, motion, or policy may file suit in the appropriate court for declaratory and injunctive relief for damages and all damages attributable to the violation. A court shall also award the prevailing party in any such lawsuit reasonable attorney fees and court costs. (Underlined language is new.)

    Protection of “Courthouse Carry” from Judicial Overreach

    Provides that a court order prohibiting the lawful carrying, possession, or transportation of a weapon in a county courthouse or other joint-use public facility shall be unenforceable unless the judicial order applies only to a courtroom or a court office, or to a courthouse used only for judicial branch functions.

    Shooting Range Protection

    Provides that cities and counties may not apply and enforce arbitrary regulations and restrictions upon those seeking to establish, use, or maintain an existing shooting range or to improve an existing range. Conditions may not be imposed beyond the requirements of standard zoning and of state law.

    It should be remembered that it was only last summer that the Des Moines City Council seriously considered criminalizing the possession within the city limits of ammunition magazines with a capacity greater than ten rounds. IFC and Des Moines citizens pushed back hard and the proposal was tabled “for further study”, but the desire for such local regulation remains strong. You can tell how significant our victory on this issue is by the shrieks and gnashing of teeth we are hearing from Bloomberg’s shills at Moms Demand Action and Everytown.

    HF716

    • Allows for supervised youth to hunt deer with handguns, eliminating the previous prohibition for those under age sixteen
    • Requires the Natural Resources Commission to use established Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives definitions of firearms when setting rules (In 2017, the NRC outlawed the hunting of deer with AR-style pistols through a tortuous and obscure new rule.)
    • Removes archaic and unnecessary language from the statute and aligns it with NRC rules
    • Clarifies and simplifies the ammunition allowed to be used in handguns (minimum four-inch barrel) in the deer hunt. Ammunition propelling an expanding-type bullet with a maximum diameter of no less than three hundred fifty thousandths of one inch and no larger than five hundred thousandths of one inch and with a published or calculated muzzle energy of five hundred-foot pounds or higher will be legal.

    SF537

    Allows for the hunting of coyotes with a weapon or scope mounted infrared light source. See the statute for limitations.

    *****

    You have seen how Iowa’s weapons laws have improved drastically over the last decade, even as they have become increasingly draconian in so many other states. You have seen in recent months how quickly Second Amendment rights can become completely forfeit at the hands of hostile elected officials and bureaucrats in times of political and social unrest – exactly when they are most needed. We – IFC’s members and allies – MUST not become complacent! Imagine what could happen here if we lose our Second Amendment friendly majorities in the Iowa legislature. Or with a Governor beholden to radical anti-gun, anti-liberty forces and moneymen… For one thing, if we lose even a couple of friendly members in the Iowa House, we will NEVER see the Freedom Amendment become part of the Iowa Constitution. We desperately need the Right to Keep and Bear Arms in our state’s highest law – especially as the enemies of liberty work to keep the U. S. Supreme Court from upholding its own Second Amendment rulings in Heller and McDonald.

    Please, if you are not already a supporting member of Iowa Firearms Coalition, join with us now. Then spend time, energy, and money in this election season to support pro-Second Amendment, pro-liberty candidates. Our own political action committee, IFC PAC, will be raising and spending funds to help inform you and other like-minded Iowa voters about those worthy of our help and our votes. Don’t sit on the sidelines and hope for the best. We can not afford to lose this one! The future nature of our state and nation is truly at stake.

  • Name it and Claim it Advocacy – Watch Out…

    June 25, 2020

    One of the things you figure out pretty quickly as a combat pilot is the need to know the tracer burn out distance of your enemy’s weapons. It’s important because you can figure out how big a calibre of a weapon is shooting at you by how high an altitude the tracer burns out at. For example, the good old AK47 has a tracer burn out of about 800 meters, but the ZSU-23, shooting a 23mm round burns out at about 2,000 meters.

    I’m not sure anyone makes a tracer round for the 22 Short, but if they did, physics tells us it would burn out in about fifty feet. Totally worthless just like the scam group of charlatans that claims to be a no-compromise Iowa (and several other states) gun-rights group. The group that has never actually had a hand in passing any legislation, yet has excelled at lining it’s founders pockets with donors cash, most recently by attacking real champions of our Second Amendment rights like Senators Jack Whitver and Representative Matt Windschilt. Both of those Patriots are once again being besmirched.

    Let’s recall what the laws were like in Iowa just ten years ago:

    -Sheriffs had absolute discretion to deny or restrict Permits to Carry Weapons for law-abiding Iowans. Prior to 2010, there were typically only about 30,000 Iowans holding PCWs. Iowa honored no other states permits and few honored ours.

    -It was a crime to allow even your own child or grandchild to touch – much less fire – a handgun. If you did it twice, it was a FELONY.

    -Permit applications were open public records, subject to publication by any “news” media.

    -Firearm sound suppressors, short barreled rifles and shotguns were illegal in Iowa, though permitted under federal law.

    -Even if an Iowan held a Permit to Carry (valid in an automobile, on a motorcycle, tractor, bicycle, etc.), it was a crime to carry a defensive handgun on an ATV, UTV, or snowmobile.

    Etc. etc., etc…

    Then compare that list to today’s laws, Iowa now has ten times the number of permit holders, we can teach our children how to shoot handguns, Iowa Offensive Firearms statues have been mostly brought into alignment with Federal Law, and we can now carry a loaded weapon in any vehicle.

    Not to mention that today, you can stand your ground if you are somewhere lawfully and are feloniously attacked, as opposed to being legally required to retreat!

    Does anyone really think those laws happened in a vacuum and while that Windschitl, Whitver, et al were working AGAINST Second Amendment causes?

    Did you know that those carping purists, better known as fundraising scammers, that continue to attack Second Amendment heroes, actually opposed many of the bills that made these remarkable changes to the law? Yet that doesn’t stop them from claiming credit for the work of IFC!

    We still look forward to Iowa Governor Kim Reynolds signing HF 2502. AND the only way the freedom amendment to the Iowa Constitution has a shot at becoming a reality is to maintain our Second Amendment friendly majorities in the November election.

    Stand up with all of us here at IFC, let’s ensure we support our friends and vote out the enemies of freedom this fall.

    Shoot Straight, speak the truth, and never surrender our liberties.

    Dave Funk, President, IFC

  • HF2455 Passes – on to Governor!

    June 11, 2020

    HF2455 passed the Senate yesterday afternoon. 48-1 in the Senate. This bill allows the use of leashed dogs to track and retrieve wounded deer. This has been a long time coming.

  • HF716 Passes Legislature – on to the Governor!

    June 10, 2020

    HF716, an act dealing with firearms requirements for deer hunting. This is largely a technical bill, meant to 1.) allow for supervised youth handgun hunting in alignment with 2017 legislation on supervised youth handgun shooting, and 2.) streamline and clarify the definition of allowable ammunition to be used in the deer hunt. It also requires the Natural Resources Council to use established federal definitions of firearms when writing NRC rules.

    This has been an extremely time-consuming project of IFC and NRA for more than three years. We have consulted and negotiated with NRC, DNR, numerous legislators, and other interest groups in attempting to correct some flaws in current statutes and rules.

    Special thanks to Representative Holt and Representative Windschitl from the Iowa House, and Senator Cournoyer and Senator Whitver from the Iowa Senate. We appreciate your hard work and perseverance.

  • HF2502 – On to the Iowa Governor!

    June 4, 2020

    Iowa Firearms Coalition and our allies in the NRA are celebrating a great victory today in our years-long battle to prevent an unworkable patchwork of weapons regulations across our state. Iowans deserve – and have been insisting upon –minimal, uniform and understandable regulation throughout the state. Without that uniformity, it becomes impractical and perhaps even impossible for law-abiding citizens to travel outside – or even within – their own community while possessing or carrying a defensive weapon. We have long fought to protect and enhance Iowa’s “preemption” statute, Iowa Code 724.28, which was enacted in April 1990, but which has been widely and openly ignored. That will soon change with the passage today of HF2502, which greatly strengthens that law.

    HF2502  is a bill for an act relating to firearms and weapons, including the storage, carrying, possession, or transportation of weapons and the establishment, use, and maintenance of shooting ranges.  This bill passed the House 52-44 in a party-line vote on February 27 of this year. It passed overwhelmingly in the Senate yesterday afternoon. The party-line vote was 32-17. The bill now goes to the Governor for consideration. We fully expect that she will quickly sign it and that it will become effective on July 1.

    Details of the bill:

    Shooting Range Protection

    Provides that cities and counties may not apply and enforce arbitrary regulations and restrictions upon those seeking to establish, use, or maintain an existing shooting range or to improve an existing range. Conditions may not be imposed beyond the requirements of standard zoning and of state law.

    Protection of “Courthouse Carry” from Judicial Overreach

    Provides that a court order prohibiting the lawful carrying, possession, or transportation of a weapon in a county courthouse or other joint-use public facility shall be unenforceable unless the judicial order applies only to a courtroom or a court office, or to a courthouse used only for judicial branch functions.

    Prohibition of Weapons Regulation by Local Governments

    Amends Iowa Code 724.28 to make absolutely clear that only the Iowa Legislature may regulate the ownership, possession, legal transfer, lawful transportation, modification, registration, or licensing of firearms, firearms attachments, or other weapons. (Underlined words are new. The statute previously applied only to firearms.)

    In addition:

    • Local governments may not enact an ordinance, motion, resolution, policy, or amendment to such effect. Such measures are void after July 1, 2020. This will include, for instance, library and park “rules of conduct”.
    • A person adversely affected by the ordinance, measure, enactment, rule, resolution, motion, or policy may file suit in the appropriate court for declaratory and injunctive relief for damages and all damages attributable to the violation. A court shall also award the prevailing party in any such lawsuit reasonable attorney fees and court costs. (Underlined language is new.)
    • Local governments may not regulate the storage of weapons or ammunition. (Exception allowed for storage rules applied to manufacture/distribution of explosive materials.)
    • The bill provides a limited exception to the prohibition on the carrying, possession, or transportation of firearms or other dangerous weapons in the buildings or physical structures located on property under the political subdivision’s control if adequate arrangements are made by the political subdivision to screen persons for firearms or other dangerous weapons and the political subdivision provides armed security personnel inside the building or physical structure where the restriction is to be in effect.

    View Rep. Steven Holt’s closing remarks when HF2502 was passed by his House Public Safety subcommittee on 2/10/2020.