• Santa delivers more than toys this Holiday Season

    December 26, 2014

    Red Ryder BB Gun

    By Jeff Peter, Guest Columnist

    I have a confession to make. I hate the Christmas Story. Not the manger scene, but the 1983 Hollywood adaptation of an all too popular fictional tale that runs rampant over the airwaves every Christmas season. I honestly don’t understand what people see in the film, but I think part of my distaste may originate in a desire for superior firepower. You see, my first firearm was also a gift. But while Ralphie received a Red Rider BB gun, I received a Rock Island built Springfield M1903 that had been in my family almost since its date of manufacture. It is my favorite firearm, my most prized possession and, I dare say, a far superior Christmas gift than a BB gun in every conceivable way.

    Like Ralphie, many Americans received the gift of marksmanship this past Christmas. While I generally skip the insanity of Black Friday, CNN reported that background checks for firearms tipped the scales at 175,000 (three per second) on America’s busiest day of shopping. Whereas some seasonal shoppers may have taken personal advantage of clever marketing strategies like the “Twelve Days of Armalite,” it would be a safe assumption that a large percentage of sales would, just like Ralphie’s experience, end up next to a Christmas Tree. The recipients of those gifts may surprise you.

    The Washington Post reported that the ranks of female firearms ownership have swelled by 8 percent since 2005 alone, and all you have to do is take a trip to your local gun dealer to see a possible reason. My local shop had a pink and black camouflaged Black Rain Ordnance rifle that disappeared during the holidays and I wasn’t that shocked to find out that a young friend of mine had just purchased her first rifle.

    Marketing and cosmetics can sweeten a sale, and manufacturers are all too happy to satisfy the desires of both sexes. After all, what better way to bolster holiday cheer than to share your passion with a loved one? The numbers speak for themselves. Be it hunting, trap, marksmanship or otherwise, the American tradition of firearms proved to be alive and well this year, especially at Christmas.

    Jeff Peter is a resident of Iowa and a life long firearms enthusiast and collector. He is a NRA member and a graduate of Iowa State University.

    Did you do a little window shopping this holiday season and see something that would fit your special someone? Or maybe fill that empty spot in the safe you’ve been meaning to occupy? Did a narrow box wrapped in red paper and a green bow bring a smile to a youngster’s face you know and care about? If so, we’d love to hear about it. Post a picture on our Facebook page or tweet it to us!

  • FBI Data Confirms: More Guns DO NOT Mean More Crime

    November 12, 2014

     

    FBI Data

    Dr. John R. Lott, Jr., and the folks at the Crime Prevention Research Center just released their latest findings that indicate an important trend. Murder rates in the United States have been falling steadily for the last several years, based on the latest numbers from the FBI’s Uniform Crime Report. Meantime, the number of Americans with Concealed Carry Permits, and gun purchases have risen very dramatically over the same period of time.

    Keep in mind it’s impossible to say that increased gun sales and concealed carry permits is the exact cause of this drop in crime. But we can say without a doubt that more guns being sold, and more Americans carrying concealed DOES NOT LEAD TO MORE MURDERS.

    Remember this the next time you see the “gunsense crowd” droning on about blood in the streets and how critical things are the United States. Tell them they’re much safer in the US than they were 20 years ago.

    The facts are:

    • Gun sales have been on the rise for years
    • Concealed Carry Permit holders are dramatically increasing in number
    • The number of murders have fallen dramatically (down approximately 40% since 1994)
    • The violent crime rate has been cut in half (down 49% since 1994)

     

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  • 13 Most Dangerous Cities in Iowa

    November 6, 2014

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    Whether you choose to acknowledge it or not, our own personal safety is every individual’s responsibility. The folks over at HomeSecurityShield have sifted through the FBI’s Uniform Crime Report to compile a list of the 13 statistically most dangerous cities in Iowa. The rankings are based off of violent crime, such as: murder/manslaughter, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated assault. Also included are stats on property crime, such as: burglary, theft, arson.

    Iowa Firearms Coalition encourages everyone to take responsibility for their own safety. Whether this means carrying a concealed firearm, pepper spray, a taser, or learning basic self-defense, being alert and prepared are two of the best things you can do to keep yourself from becoming a victim. If you’re interested in getting a Permit to Carry, or doing some training, we highly recommend you check out our Permits and Training page.

     

    1. Council Bluffs – Violent Crimes: 11.86 per 1,000 residents

      Council Bluffs has a crime rate of about 80 per one thousand residents.

      Your chance of becoming a victim of a crime in Council Bluffs? One in 12.

    2. Keokuk – Violent Crimes: 10.33 per 1,000 residents

      Keokuk has a crime rate of about 66 per one thousand residents.

      Your chance of becoming a victim of a crime in Keokuk? One in 15.

    3. Waterloo – Violent Crimes: 6.82 per 1,000 residents

      Waterloo has a crime rate of about 43 per one thousand residents.

      Your chance of becoming a victim of a crime in Waterloo? One in 23.

    4. Burlington – Violent Crimes: 6.78 per 1,000 residents

      Burlington has a crime rate of about 47 per one thousand residents.

      Your chance of becoming a victim of a crime in Burlington? One in 21.

    5. Muscatine – Violent Crimes: 6.78 per 1,000 residents

      Muscatine has a crime rate of about 42 per one thousand residents.

      Your chance of becoming a victim of a crime in Muscatine? One in 24.

    6. Clinton – Violent Crimes: 6.35 per 1,000 residents

      Clinton has a crime rate of about 51 per one thousand residents.

      Your chance of becoming a victim of a crime in Clinton? One in 19.

    7. Davenport – Violent Crimes: 5.97 per 1,000 residents

      Davenport has a crime rate of about 45 per one thousand residents.

      Your chance of becoming a victim of a crime in Davenport? One in 22.

    8. Fort Madison – Violent Crimes: 5.44 per 1,000 residents

      Fort Madison has a crime rate of about 30 per one thousand residents.

      Your chance of becoming a victim of a crime in Fort Madison? One in 33.

    9. Fort Dodge – Violent Crimes: 5.34 per 1,000 residents

      Fort Dodge has a crime rate of about 52 per one thousand residents.

      Your chance of becoming a victim of a crime in Fort Dodge? One in 19.

    10. Boone – Violent Crimes: 5.28 per 1,000 residents

      Boone has a crime rate of about 31 per one thousand residents.

      Your chance of becoming a victim of a crime in Boone? One in 32.

    11. Des Moines – Violent Crimes: 5.27 per 1,000 residents

      Des Moines has a crime rate of about 55 per one thousand residents.

      Your chance of becoming a victim of a crime in Des Moines? One in 18.

    12. Centerville – Violent Crimes: 5.26 per 1,000 residents

      Centerville has a crime rate of about 50 per one thousand residents.

      Your chance of becoming a victim of a crime in Centerville? One in 20.

    13. Marshalltown – Violent Crimes:5.09 per 1,000 residents

      Marshalltown has a crime rate of about 38 per one thousand residents.

      Your chance of becoming a victim of a crime in Marshalltown? One in 27.


    Iowa Firearms Coalition is an entirely volunteer, grassroots, 2nd Amendment advocacy group. Responsible for bringing uniformity to Iowa’s Concealed Weapons Permitting process, IFC’s members work to protect and enhance 2nd Amendment rights in Iowa. An affiliate of the National Rifle Association, the IFC actively seeks to foster and promote the shooting sports. Sign up for our email list for the latest on 2nd Amendment issues in Iowa. You can support our work by becoming a member, or making a donation.