• The Minnesota Reciprocity Problem – Why Language Matters

    August 17, 2015
    Minnesotans' new law makes great strides in reciprocity with neighboring states, but comes at a high price for anyone who lives out of state. It's a also a great example of how important specific words can be.

    Minnesotans’ new law makes great strides in reciprocity with neighboring states, but comes at a high price for anyone living out-of-state.

    By now you may have heard Minnesota no longer recognizes Utah’s concealed carry weapon permits, as well as three other states (Missouri, Texas, and Wyoming). What you may not have heard is this change in Minnesota law means Minnesotan’s now have reciprocity with nine new states, most notably North and South Dakota, their neighbors to the west. Prior to this Minnesota refused to recognize out-of-state concealed carry permits from any of their bordering states. This is a significant improvement for Minnesota residents, particularly those that live and work along the western border with North and South Dakota.

    BUT, the loss of reciprocity with the state of Utah has a direct impact on Iowans because tens of thousands of us have Utah permits to carry, which up until very recently meant we could legally carry in Minnesota. Now these Iowans will have to find other means to carry in order to remain lawful.

    Similar

    Concealed carry reciprocity letter from the Minnesota DPS commissioner.

    This letter from the Minnesota Department of Public Safety explains why they dropped their reciprocity agreements with four states including Utah.

    It took pro-Second Amendment advocates in Minnesota years of hard work to secure reciprocity with their neighbors to their west. But unfortunately they ended their agreement with Utah and three other states all because of the interpretation of one word: similar.

    Lawmakers in Minnesota approved the update to their state’s carry law, but ultimately it’s up to Minnesota’s Department of Public Safety (DPS) to determine what other state’s carry laws apply. The mandate says in order to recognize an out-of-state carry permit, the state of origin must have a permitting system that is “similar.” So when the Minnesota DPS reviewed the updated carry law they determined that Utah’s permits are not similar because there’s no proficiency test in Utah. Which coincidentally is part of the reason they refuse to recognize Iowa’s Permit to Carry.

    There’s two important points to take away from this story. First, if we had national reciprocity this would never have been an issue. But more importantly…

    Words Matter.

    Had the Minnesota law been written another way, or updated so that the DPS had to maintain its current reciprocity agreements this story would be much different. But as it stands the interpretation of the words “substantially similar” falls to the DPS and at the end of the day this gives them a tremendous amount of power.

    Specific words truly do matter especially when it comes to changing laws. Every single word in a bill must be perfect. When the wrong word, or a weak or ambiguous word makes its way into a bill that gets signed into law the results can be utterly disastrous.

    May Issue vs. Shall Issue

    A perfect example of this took place right here in Iowa’s firearms community. Anybody remember the days of “May Issue” permits to carry? Before 2010 each county sheriff in Iowa got to choose who got a permit to carry concealed weapons and it was an absolute disaster. Residents of some counties had no problems getting permits, while others who were just as qualified had virtually no chance of ever getting a permit. All because of one single word in Iowa’s legal code–”may.” A county sheriff may issue a permit to carry to qualified individuals.

    It took seven years, thousands Iowans, and tens of thousands of emails, phone calls and volunteer hours to change that one word–may–to shall. It may not seem like much, but legally speaking the word may is vastly different from Shall. Changing that one single word single-handedly lead to a ten-fold increase in the number of Iowan’s with permits to carry.

    There’s plenty more examples to go around. We all know how the anti-gun zealots love to argue our Second Amendment rights need be reigned in ‘because they only apply to a “well regulated militia”‘ aka the National Guard or various military units. Not to private citizens. Fortunately they’re FLAT OUT WRONG. In the 2008 Heller case the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the Second Amendment protects an individual’s right to possess and carry firearms. In plain English the court ruling effectively said the word militia means all lawful citizens, not just organized units of the US military. Once again specific words and their interpretation can make or break a law, amendment, bill, etc..

    The devil’s in the details

    That idiom rings especially true with gun laws. You may have a bill that looks great on the surface, but one misplaced word, one tiny slip up, or a single malicious entry by an anti-gun legislator can destroy months or years of hard work. The devil is truly hidden in the details, and anti-gunners without a leg to stand on will do often try to sour good legislation with bad language. This is something the Iowa Firearms Coalition is well aware of and constantly on the lookout for. Unfortunately for Iowans’s who work or travel in Minnesota, this latest change to their carry law is another example of how extremely important a pro-Second Amendment bill’s language is.

    The moral of the story: the next time you see a so-called “pro-gun bill” written or amended by anti-gun legislators think long and hard about their motivation and every single word they wrote.


    Iowa Firearms Coalition is an entirely volunteer, grassroots, Second Amendment advocacy group. Responsible for bringing uniformity to Iowa’s Concealed Weapons Permitting process, IFC’s members work to protect and enhance Second Amendment rights in Iowa. An affiliate of the National Rifle Association, the IFC actively seeks to foster and promote the shooting sports. Sign up for our email list for the latest on Second Amendment issues in Iowa. You can support our work by becoming a member, or making a donation. 

  • Reciprocity Alert – Minnesota No Longer Honoring Utah CCW Permits

    August 13, 2015
    Iowan's don't be caught of guard if you're traveling in Minnesota - MN no longer honors Utah CCW Permits

    Attention Iowans and anyone who is in Minnesota regularly – if you have a Utah CCW Permit and use that to carry in Minnesota you’re now going to have to reevaluate how you carry in the Land of 10,000 Lakes.

     

    If you have a Utah CCW Permit then you need to be aware that in response to a recent change in Minnesota Laws, the Minnesota Department of Public Safety has removed four states from the list of Permits that they honor.

    A Utah CCW Permit is no longer valid in Minnesota.

    Missouri, Texas, Wyoming and Utah are the four states that are no longer recognized by our neighboringmap Northern State.

    The reason stated for Utah being removed is due to lack of a shooting requirement for permit training. This is also one of the reasons why they will not recognize an Iowa Permit.

    I was told by someone who spoke to a Minnesota Elected Official, that several people are not happy with the Minnesota Department of Public Safety’s action on this. It is always possible that there could be some backlash, and this decision could be reversed. Please do not rely on rumors, and be sure to check and verify any information.

    If you want to do something to help fix this situation contacting the Minnesota Department of Public Safety would be a good start. Politely let them know you’d like to see Minnesota’s reciprocity agreements with Missouri, Texas, Wyoming and Utah restored.  While you’re at it, ask them to honor Iowa’s Permit to Carry certification as well.

    It is possible to get an out-of-state Minnesota Permit. The cost is $100 for five years and you must apply to a Minnesota Sheriff in person. I am still researching the training requirements, but from what I understand, the instruction does not have to be taken in Minnesota, but it is required to have a shooting component.

    Hopefully this is a good reminder to be sure to check and double-check the reciprocity of your permit before you travel. Understanding and knowing the laws of the states you plan to visit is also very important, as they can vary quite a bit from state to state. An Iowa Permit to Carry Weapons is currently honored in 32 states.

    The links below are a good websites to check and compare for more information.

    https://dps.mn.gov/divisions/bca/bca-divisions/administrative/Pages/permit-to-carry-reciprocity.aspx

    http://www.handgunlaw.us/

    http://www.usacarry.com/

     

    Go Safe

    Steve Hensyel

     

    Steve Hensyel is a guest writer for the Iowa Firearms Coalition. Hensyel is the owner of Hawkeye Firearms Instruction and an IFC past president.


    Iowa Firearms Coalition is an entirely volunteer, grassroots, Second Amendment advocacy group. Responsible for bringing uniformity to Iowa’s Concealed Weapons Permitting process, IFC’s members work to protect and enhance Second Amendment rights in Iowa. An affiliate of the National Rifle Association, the IFC actively seeks to foster and promote the shooting sports. Sign up for our email list for the latest on Second Amendment issues in Iowa. You can support our work by becoming a member, or making a donation. 

  • State Senator Brad Zaun Refuses Media Requests About Carrying Concealed at the Capitol

    February 23, 2015
    Brad Zaun refuses to answer Des Moines Register questions about carrying a concealed firearm.

    Brad Zaun refuses to answer Des Moines Register questions about carrying a concealed firearm.

    State Senator Brad Zaun is refusing to answer questions about whether or not he carries a concealed weapon while at work in the state capitol. The Des Moines Register recently questioned him again about carrying a 9mm for personal protection.

    “It’s none of your business, none of your business, no,” Zaun told William Petroski of the Des Moines Register.

    Zaun then added, “I don’t think it is anybody’s business when I carry, at what times I carry, and I am not going to disclose it.”

    Last year Zaun told a panel of Register writers that he sometimes carried a 9mm pistol in the capitol, and he knew of several other elected officials who did as well.

    “Honestly, I have in the past. I don’t do it every day. But I will tell you that when I do public events, a lot of times I do carry,” Zaun said at the time.

    Michael Marshall, Secretary of the Iowa Senate says state code prohibits the public from carrying concealed weapons in state capitol buildings. But legislators are not considered members of the public and it’s perfectly legal for them to carry concealed if they’re properly permitted.

    Given incidents like the attempted murder of a Jackson County public official, or the shooting at a New Hope, Minnesota city council meeting, more and more public officials are realizing so-called “Gun Free Zones” mean nothing and won’t stop someone intent on doing harm to others. This has led to more and more legislators taking responsibility for their own personal defense, and that should be commended.

    The Iowa Firearms Coalition applauds Sen. Zaun on remaining tight-lipped about whether or not he carries. Concealed means concealed, and Zaun is a trained, permitted, and responsible citizen who’s exercising his rights.

    Carry on Brad!


    Iowa Firearms Coalition is an entirely volunteer, grassroots, 2nd Amendment advocacy group. Responsible for bringing uniformity to Iowa’s Concealed Weapons Permitting process, IFC’s members work to protect and enhance 2nd Amendment rights in Iowa. An affiliate of the National Rifle Association, the IFC actively seeks to foster and promote the shooting sports. Sign up for our email list for the latest on 2nd Amendment issues in Iowa. You can support our work by becoming a member, or making a donation.

  • Former Mason City Officer Shot at City Council Meeting — Concealed Carrier Steps Up & Protects Fellow Council Members

    January 27, 2015

    UPDATE — 11:30am — Former MCPD officer among the wounded

    EerniesseWe’ve just learned that one of the officers shot in last night’s incident was a former Iowa resident and police officer in Mason City, Iowa.

    KIMT is reporting that Joshua Eernisse is a former patrol officer with the Mason City Police Department.

    Eerniesse and one other officer, Adam Johnson, were shot shortly after an officer swearing-in ceremony last night (01/27/15) at the New Hope, Minnesota city council meeting.

    Chief Deputy Mike Carlson of the Hennepin County Sheriff’s Department says Eerniesse and Johnson are both in good condition and are recovering in the hospital.

    The shooter was shot and killed by other officers at the city council meeting.

    More details as they become available.

    Previous post

    An active shooting situation unfolded last night in the middle of a city council meeting in New Hope Minnesota, a Minneapolis suburb. The council had just wrapped up swearing-in two new officers when an adult male started shooting at the officers.

    Public access tv cameras were rolling the whole time. And as you can see there was plenty of confusion amongst the council members, but John Elder who was carrying a concealed firearm stayed calm protecting his fellow council members.

    After opening fire on the police officers, the shooter was engaged by police and eventually shot and killed. Media reports indicate that at least one officer was injured during the exchange, but they are expected to survive.

    There’s no word on whether or not the New Hope, Minnesota’s city council chambers are a so-called “gun free zone.” If they are, this is just one more example in a long list of cases proving that a “Gun Free Zone” sticker on a door does absolutely nothing to stop someone who’s intent on doing harm.

    This incident brings up memories of a similar shooting here in Maquoketa, Iowa less than a year ago. Last September a mad man with a gun, entered the Jackson County Courthouse (a building with a very clearly labeled “gun free zone” sticker on the door) and shot at a county supervisor. Fortunately the gunman missed. After a brief struggle turned the gun on himself.

    Click here for more details on last September’s shooting at the Jackson County Courthouse.


    Iowa Firearms Coalition is an entirely volunteer, grassroots, Second Amendment advocacy group. Responsible for bringing uniformity to Iowa’s Concealed Weapons Permitting process, IFC’s members work to protect and enhance Second Amendment rights in Iowa. An affiliate of the National Rifle Association, the IFC actively seeks to foster and promote the shooting sports.Sign up for our email listfor the latest on Second Amendment issues in Iowa. You can support our work by becoming a member, or making a donation.