• The Minnesota Reciprocity Problem – Why Language Matters

    August 17, 2015
    Minnesotans' new law makes great strides in reciprocity with neighboring states, but comes at a high price for anyone who lives out of state. It's a also a great example of how important specific words can be.

    Minnesotans’ new law makes great strides in reciprocity with neighboring states, but comes at a high price for anyone living out-of-state.

    By now you may have heard Minnesota no longer recognizes Utah’s concealed carry weapon permits, as well as three other states (Missouri, Texas, and Wyoming). What you may not have heard is this change in Minnesota law means Minnesotan’s now have reciprocity with nine new states, most notably North and South Dakota, their neighbors to the west. Prior to this Minnesota refused to recognize out-of-state concealed carry permits from any of their bordering states. This is a significant improvement for Minnesota residents, particularly those that live and work along the western border with North and South Dakota.

    BUT, the loss of reciprocity with the state of Utah has a direct impact on Iowans because tens of thousands of us have Utah permits to carry, which up until very recently meant we could legally carry in Minnesota. Now these Iowans will have to find other means to carry in order to remain lawful.

    Similar

    Concealed carry reciprocity letter from the Minnesota DPS commissioner.

    This letter from the Minnesota Department of Public Safety explains why they dropped their reciprocity agreements with four states including Utah.

    It took pro-Second Amendment advocates in Minnesota years of hard work to secure reciprocity with their neighbors to their west. But unfortunately they ended their agreement with Utah and three other states all because of the interpretation of one word: similar.

    Lawmakers in Minnesota approved the update to their state’s carry law, but ultimately it’s up to Minnesota’s Department of Public Safety (DPS) to determine what other state’s carry laws apply. The mandate says in order to recognize an out-of-state carry permit, the state of origin must have a permitting system that is “similar.” So when the Minnesota DPS reviewed the updated carry law they determined that Utah’s permits are not similar because there’s no proficiency test in Utah. Which coincidentally is part of the reason they refuse to recognize Iowa’s Permit to Carry.

    There’s two important points to take away from this story. First, if we had national reciprocity this would never have been an issue. But more importantly…

    Words Matter.

    Had the Minnesota law been written another way, or updated so that the DPS had to maintain its current reciprocity agreements this story would be much different. But as it stands the interpretation of the words “substantially similar” falls to the DPS and at the end of the day this gives them a tremendous amount of power.

    Specific words truly do matter especially when it comes to changing laws. Every single word in a bill must be perfect. When the wrong word, or a weak or ambiguous word makes its way into a bill that gets signed into law the results can be utterly disastrous.

    May Issue vs. Shall Issue

    A perfect example of this took place right here in Iowa’s firearms community. Anybody remember the days of “May Issue” permits to carry? Before 2010 each county sheriff in Iowa got to choose who got a permit to carry concealed weapons and it was an absolute disaster. Residents of some counties had no problems getting permits, while others who were just as qualified had virtually no chance of ever getting a permit. All because of one single word in Iowa’s legal code–”may.” A county sheriff may issue a permit to carry to qualified individuals.

    It took seven years, thousands Iowans, and tens of thousands of emails, phone calls and volunteer hours to change that one word–may–to shall. It may not seem like much, but legally speaking the word may is vastly different from Shall. Changing that one single word single-handedly lead to a ten-fold increase in the number of Iowan’s with permits to carry.

    There’s plenty more examples to go around. We all know how the anti-gun zealots love to argue our Second Amendment rights need be reigned in ‘because they only apply to a “well regulated militia”‘ aka the National Guard or various military units. Not to private citizens. Fortunately they’re FLAT OUT WRONG. In the 2008 Heller case the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the Second Amendment protects an individual’s right to possess and carry firearms. In plain English the court ruling effectively said the word militia means all lawful citizens, not just organized units of the US military. Once again specific words and their interpretation can make or break a law, amendment, bill, etc..

    The devil’s in the details

    That idiom rings especially true with gun laws. You may have a bill that looks great on the surface, but one misplaced word, one tiny slip up, or a single malicious entry by an anti-gun legislator can destroy months or years of hard work. The devil is truly hidden in the details, and anti-gunners without a leg to stand on will do often try to sour good legislation with bad language. This is something the Iowa Firearms Coalition is well aware of and constantly on the lookout for. Unfortunately for Iowans’s who work or travel in Minnesota, this latest change to their carry law is another example of how extremely important a pro-Second Amendment bill’s language is.

    The moral of the story: the next time you see a so-called “pro-gun bill” written or amended by anti-gun legislators think long and hard about their motivation and every single word they wrote.


    Iowa Firearms Coalition is an entirely volunteer, grassroots, Second Amendment advocacy group. Responsible for bringing uniformity to Iowa’s Concealed Weapons Permitting process, IFC’s members work to protect and enhance Second Amendment rights in Iowa. An affiliate of the National Rifle Association, the IFC actively seeks to foster and promote the shooting sports. Sign up for our email list for the latest on Second Amendment issues in Iowa. You can support our work by becoming a member, or making a donation. 

  • Reciprocity Alert – Minnesota No Longer Honoring Utah CCW Permits

    August 13, 2015
    Iowan's don't be caught of guard if you're traveling in Minnesota - MN no longer honors Utah CCW Permits

    Attention Iowans and anyone who is in Minnesota regularly – if you have a Utah CCW Permit and use that to carry in Minnesota you’re now going to have to reevaluate how you carry in the Land of 10,000 Lakes.

     

    If you have a Utah CCW Permit then you need to be aware that in response to a recent change in Minnesota Laws, the Minnesota Department of Public Safety has removed four states from the list of Permits that they honor.

    A Utah CCW Permit is no longer valid in Minnesota.

    Missouri, Texas, Wyoming and Utah are the four states that are no longer recognized by our neighboringmap Northern State.

    The reason stated for Utah being removed is due to lack of a shooting requirement for permit training. This is also one of the reasons why they will not recognize an Iowa Permit.

    I was told by someone who spoke to a Minnesota Elected Official, that several people are not happy with the Minnesota Department of Public Safety’s action on this. It is always possible that there could be some backlash, and this decision could be reversed. Please do not rely on rumors, and be sure to check and verify any information.

    If you want to do something to help fix this situation contacting the Minnesota Department of Public Safety would be a good start. Politely let them know you’d like to see Minnesota’s reciprocity agreements with Missouri, Texas, Wyoming and Utah restored.  While you’re at it, ask them to honor Iowa’s Permit to Carry certification as well.

    It is possible to get an out-of-state Minnesota Permit. The cost is $100 for five years and you must apply to a Minnesota Sheriff in person. I am still researching the training requirements, but from what I understand, the instruction does not have to be taken in Minnesota, but it is required to have a shooting component.

    Hopefully this is a good reminder to be sure to check and double-check the reciprocity of your permit before you travel. Understanding and knowing the laws of the states you plan to visit is also very important, as they can vary quite a bit from state to state. An Iowa Permit to Carry Weapons is currently honored in 32 states.

    The links below are a good websites to check and compare for more information.

    https://dps.mn.gov/divisions/bca/bca-divisions/administrative/Pages/permit-to-carry-reciprocity.aspx

    http://www.handgunlaw.us/

    http://www.usacarry.com/

     

    Go Safe

    Steve Hensyel

     

    Steve Hensyel is a guest writer for the Iowa Firearms Coalition. Hensyel is the owner of Hawkeye Firearms Instruction and an IFC past president.


    Iowa Firearms Coalition is an entirely volunteer, grassroots, Second Amendment advocacy group. Responsible for bringing uniformity to Iowa’s Concealed Weapons Permitting process, IFC’s members work to protect and enhance Second Amendment rights in Iowa. An affiliate of the National Rifle Association, the IFC actively seeks to foster and promote the shooting sports. Sign up for our email list for the latest on Second Amendment issues in Iowa. You can support our work by becoming a member, or making a donation. 

  • Waterloo Native Saves Wife Before Being Beaten to Death with Hammers

    December 1, 2014

    Begic

     

    Our thoughts and prayers go out to the family of Waterloo, Iowa native Zemir Begic. Over the weekend 32-year-old Begic was beaten to death by a group of hammer wielding teenagers in the St. Louis, Missouri area. The Associated Press is reporting that Begic and his wife were in their car near Bevo Mills just before midnight Saturday when a group of juveniles surrounded his vehicle and began pounding on his car. Begic got out of his car and was almost immediately attacked by the group.

    The St. Louis Metro Police found Begic lying unconscious with injuries to his head, abdomen, face, and mouth at roughly 12:15 Sunday morning. He was taken the hospital, and then pronounced dead.

    In an interview with KSDK Arijana Mujkanovic, Begic’s wife explains how his last moments were spent saving her life: “The last thing he did before he actually died was pull me out of the way and put himself in front of me, basically giving up his life for me,” Mujkanovic says.

    KWWL is reporting that Begic was a native of Waterloo who was a student in the Waterloo district but did not graduate from there, according to Waterloo Schools spokeswoman Tara Thomas. According to his Facebook page, Begic attended Waterloo West.

    St. Louis Police have arrested a of pair teens aged 15 and 16. They’re reportedly still looking for two more. No motive for the attacks have been announced.

    A GoFundMe page has been set up to help pay for Begic funeral arrangements.

    Please remember this story the next time you and your loved ones are out in public. Being attacked by a mob of hammer wielding teens was probably one of the last things Zemir Begic and his wife had on their minds, but that does not mean the threat does not exist. This is another reminder that no matter where you are you must be prepared to defend yourself. Your personal protection is your responsibility. The police simply cannot be everywhere, and this is an unfortunate but perfect example of that fact. Please take a moment to visit our Permits, Training, and Iowa Carry Law Info page for more information on ways to protect yourselves and your loved ones.


    Iowa Firearms Coalition is an entirely volunteer, grassroots, 2nd Amendment advocacy group. Responsible for bringing uniformity to Iowa’s Concealed Weapons Permitting process, IFC’s members work to protect and enhance 2nd Amendment rights in Iowa. An affiliate of the National Rifle Association, the IFC actively seeks to foster and promote the shooting sports. Sign up for our email list for the latest on 2nd Amendment issues in Iowa. You can support our work by becoming a member, or making a donation.

  • Big surprise: gun sales skyrocketing near the site of St. Louis riots

    August 14, 2014

    APTOPIX Police Shooting Missouri

    This week in St. Louis:

    A young man is dead. Protesters are rioting. And honest, law-abiding citizens are being forced to re-think how they are going to protect themselves and their families.

    It’s hardly surprising (but still fascinating) to hear that when a community is on the edge of martial law, gun shops are seeing a sharp increase in sales. As noted below in the St. Louis Business Journal gun shops are seeing an uncharacteristic spike in sales during what is usually one of their slowest parts of the year.

    Whatever your opinion is on the death of Mike Brown, the protesters, or the police response in Ferguson, Missouri, one thing transcends all sides of this argument. When there’s a legitimate threat of violence to one’s family, or one’s self, people overwhelmingly turn to firearms to defend themselves. We’re hoping these new gun owners remember to get proper training, and have an honest discussion about firearm safety with their families and those surround them.

    As always, we hope and pray for a peaceful resolution. No one wants to see anyone hurt unnecessarily, be it the protesters, the police, or innocent bystanders.

    With that said, I can’t help but wonder what Everytown for Gun Safety or Moms Demand Action would suggest a homeowner do when faced with mob violence on their front doorstep…


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    Gun stores see sales spike in wake of Ferguson riots

    http://www.bizjournals.com/stlouis/news/2014/08/12/gun-stores-see-sales-spike-in-wake-of-ferguson.html

    For the past two days, Steve King has been “unbelievably busy” at his gun store, Metro Shooting at 11434 St. Charles Rock Road. King said business spiked 50 percent as local residents respond to the violent events taking place in Ferguson.

    “We’ve sold a variety of handguns, shotguns and AR-15s (a semi-automatic rifle),” King said. “All of the sales are having to do with home defense.”

    King, who owns the store that has 17 employees and 2013 revenue of about $2 million, added that customers have ranged from new firearm buyers to those upgrading their current arsenal. He said both black and white individuals have purchased firearms at his store over the past few days.

    “Usually it’s pretty slow through the summer, but this has been a huge spike for business,” King said. “People are hunkering down because those events are taking place too close to their own home … in some cases, a half a mile away. Lots of people are afraid.”

    Officials at Mid America Arms, at 8205 Gravois Road, have seen a similar increase in business. Owner Al Rothweiler had to break away from his jammed-packed store this afternoon to talk to the Business Journal.

    “We were closed Sunday and Monday, but today, sales have been brisk, and the store is full of people,” said Rothweiler, who estimated that his sales were also up 50 percent Tuesday compared with a typical day in August. “Everyone who bought today mentioned something about Ferguson.”

    Before this week’s spike, Rothweiler said August had been a slow month for the $3.5 million business, but he doesn’t expect the spike to continue.

    John Ham, public information officer for the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives’ Kansas City division that includes St. Louis, said he has not heard or seen any increase in firearms purchases for the area. Calls to the FBI requesting firearm background check statistics were not returned.