• 2016 Designated Marksman Challenge

    April 23, 2016

    2016 Designated Marksman Challenge
    April 30th and October 8th
    Colfax Range
    9AM start
    $15 entry fee

    Shooters will be broken up into groups and cycled through each stage.
    Shooters will get into position and make ready
    A horn will sound and shooters will have 2 minutes to locate and shoot each target for the stage
    Targets will be marked with a Color and number
    Hit or miss, scoring
    Horn will sound at 2 minutes
    Shooter will empty and show clear

    We will rotate through shooters and stages until everyone is done.

    All 3 rifle stages and the pistol stage will be hot at the same time.

    We’re shooting mostly 5″ circles, so the accuracy challenge isn’t too high. But your positions will be unfamiliar to most and your working against a clock.

    We’re aiming for a safe, fun match and nothing more. If you’re a competitor on a national scale, you’re going to laugh your way to first place… but if your shooting is mostly limited to bench work, this will be a fun challenging match.

    Dates are April 30th and October 8th.

     

    Email JoelAC1989@gmail.com if you plan to attend.

    Please include the number of shooters and spectators you plan to bring to the event.

     

    Match starts at 9AM at the Colfax Range

    946 W 120th St S
    Colfax, IA 50054

    $15 entry fee

    What You’ll need:
    Centerfire Rifle, speed limit of 3100FPS
    30 rounds of Ammo for the 3 rifle stages
    Centerfire Pistol w/extra mags
    Holster and Mag pouch
    30+ rounds Pistol ammo
    Eye and ear protection

    Bring any Snacks or Drinks you may need.

     


    Iowa Firearms Coalition is an entirely volunteer, grassroots, Second Amendment advocacy group. Responsible for bringing uniformity to Iowa’s Permit to Carry process, IFC’s members work to protect and enhance Second Amendment rights in Iowa. An affiliate of the National Rifle Association, the IFC actively seeks to foster and promote the shooting sports. Sign up for our email list for the latest on Second Amendment issues in Iowa. You can support our work by becoming a member, or making a donation. 

  • Suppressor Rally – After Action Report

    April 17, 2016

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    Yesterday was the kind of day that makes me proud to be a part of the Iowa Firearms Coalition.

    Starting at 10 AM this past Saturday morning, hundreds of people from all over the state flocked to Brownells’ Big Springs Range in Searsboro to attend the American Suppressor Association’s suppressor shoot. ASA, in conjunction with Brownells, held the event to celebrate the recent passage of HF2279, the Hearing Protection Act, and to educate Iowans about suppressors, their use, and the process of obtaining them.

    Staffed by representatives of over half a dozen suppressor manufacturers from all over the country and a few local dealers, those who came were treated to free ammo to fire through a wide assortment of suppressed firearms, ranging from bolt action .338 Lapua Magnums to Kriss Vectors, from Ruger MkIIIs and 1911s to Uzis and ARs. It was a veritable gun cornucopia, all stocked with the finest cans the market has to offer.

    On hand to greet and talk to people were IFC board member and NRA VP Pete Brownell and his father Frank, Brownells’ communications director Ryan Repp and his cohort Roy Hill, the intrepid leaders of the ASA Knox and Michael Williams, and of course, several members of the IFC board and executive committee, including fellow lobbyist Richard Rogers. Representative Matt Windschitl (R-H17), the champion of Second Amendment virtues in the Iowa Legislature, was there with his wife and kids as well.

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    As I walked around chatting with Iowans who drove anywhere from just ten minutes to come, to three hours from the farthest reaches of the state, just to see, shoot and learn about suppressors, I was struck by just how large of a positive impact we’ve made on gun owning Iowans. It’s easy to lose track of this in the daily grind at the Capitol, after all the meetings and phone calls and e-mails. But everywhere I looked I saw the smiling faces of good folks enjoying the fellowship of other gun owners and their families, and it more than reminded me why we do what we do.

    In a private moment away from the crowds, I stood with Matt Windschitl and I asked him how it felt to witness the result of all his hard work. His reply? “*Our* hard work, you mean.”

    Our hard work indeed.

    In appreciation of that hard work, ASA saw fit to honor you and IFC with their 2016 Partnership Award, to recognize your excellence in suppressor advocacy. Attached are some pictures of that award. As you look at them, remember: The award is *yours*. I only received it on your behalf because we couldn’t fit the thousands of you up on that flat-bed trailer.

    Everyone, thank you SO much for everything you do. The session isn’t even over yet, and we’ve already chalked up two more in the win column. IFC would be absolutely nowhere without all your e-mails and your phone calls to legislators, and of course, all your memberships, donations and ongoing moral and volunteer support.

    You all truly define the meaning of “group effort” and “teamwork” and it’s one of the most amazing and heartwarming things to witness and be part of. With a dash of luck hopefully I’ll be able to report still another win or two before this session is over…And if and when that happens, whether it’s this year or next year or in the years ahead, take pride in knowing that you’re part of a statewide coalition of thousands people who all know that freedom starts right here at home, and they all have your back to protect it.

    Thanks again for all you do, everyone. It is an honor to work with you and for you.

    All hands to the middle,
    Barry
    IFC President

     


    Iowa Firearms Coalition is an entirely volunteer, grassroots, Second Amendment advocacy group. Responsible for bringing uniformity to Iowa’s Permit to Carry process, IFC’s members work to protect and enhance Second Amendment rights in Iowa. An affiliate of the National Rifle Association, the IFC actively seeks to foster and promote the shooting sports. Sign up for our email list for the latest on Second Amendment issues in Iowa. You can support our work by becoming a member, or making a donation. 

  • What Every Shooter Should Carry at the Range

    August 10, 2015
    A case for for first aid kits at the gun range.

    Is your range bag truly complete? If it doesn’t have a first aid kit, the answer is ‘No.’

     

    You go to the range to practice and prepare but are you actually prepared while at the range?

    It is something none of us like to think about. We follow the rules of safety and encourage others to do so too. But what if the unthinkable happened and there was an accident at the range. Would you be prepared?

    When I go to the range or travel I carry several items in my vehicle in case of emergency. Among them are a general medical kit with items such as band aids, gauze, ice packs, aspirin, bottled water, bug spray and an overall assortment of items that myself or someone else might need.

    The second most important item I carry is a trauma kit geared towards gun shot wounds (GSW). My actual trauma kit is in its own small pouch or pack that I can take with me to the bench or slip into my range bag with my other gear. It is actually small enough to be worn on my belt without being in the way. The items I have in my trauma kit are:

    C.A.T – Combat application tourniquet                                                       

    Is your range bag ready for a day of shooting?

    A basic first aid kit could literally mean the difference between life and death.

    Halo sterile chest seal patch 

    4″ quik clot combat gauze  

    Nitrile gloves

    Sterile trauma dressing 

    2 6″ Rolled sterile gauze

    Scissors 

    Trauma reference card 

    These items alone are relatively inexpensive or you can actually find some pre-prepared kits with these items included. I like to keep it simple and found they were actually cheaper to purchase separately.

    A person doesn’t have to become a EMT or take lot of training to learn to use these effectively. Taking a basic first aid course is always a good idea. Getting CPR certified is fairly easy and there are basic trauma first aid courses around too. The Army Combat Trauma Course is readily available for download as a PDF and it is a pretty easy to read and understand manual. Here in Iowa, and in most states there are good Samaritan laws where someone trying to render aid is not liable. Statistics have also shown that a large majority of serious wounds to the torso or limbs are survivable if general aid is applied on-site or while still in the field

    So if the unthinkable happen would you be prepared and wouldn’t you want to be?  Please give this some thought and consider making some of these things part of your range equipment. As with everything, we hope for the best but should prepare for the worst and just a few simple items might someday turn a fun day at the range into saving a life.

    Go Safe

    Steve Hensyel

     

    Steve Hensyel is a guest writer for the Iowa Firearms Coalition. Hensyel is the owner of Hawkeye Firearms Instruction and an IFC past president.


    Iowa Firearms Coalition is an entirely volunteer, grassroots, Second Amendment advocacy group. Responsible for bringing uniformity to Iowa’s Concealed Weapons Permitting process, IFC’s members work to protect and enhance Second Amendment rights in Iowa. An affiliate of the National Rifle Association, the IFC actively seeks to foster and promote the shooting sports. Sign up for our email list for the latest on Second Amendment issues in Iowa. You can support our work by becoming a member, or making a donation. 

  • Cold Weather Training

    February 19, 2015
    Training in the cold

    As temps drop and we put more layers on, the way we carry and train must adapt.

     

    Practice and training for all types of scenarios and situations is a routine many permit holders and gun owners prepare for, but is shooting in cold weather one that you also prepare for?

    My Dad used to say there were two seasons in Iowa, winter and road construction. Here we are again, when the mercury is dipping down, and the coats and cold weather gear come out.  I am no different from most people, in that I prefer to go out shooting and practice during nice weather, and this seems to be more the case especially the older I get. Sure, I like to hunt when it is cooler and there is a skiff of snow, but I usually keep moving when out in the field.  Let’s face it, just standing outside on the range isn’t always conducive to making practice fun or using good technique.  Perhaps that is even more reason why we should include “off season” practice as part of our regular routine. Here are some tips and information to get you thinking about the challenges cold weather might bring to shooting.

    As with any outdoor winter activity, dressing properly is the key. The trick is layers of comfortable and easily removable clothing. The old timers will tell you that cotton kills because of its inability to dry quickly and holding moisture. I am a big fan of wool in at least one of my layers. So how does this relate to shooting outdoors, well the connection is easy to see on several different levels. Besides the obvious of staying warm, could you access your firearm quickly, proficiently and safely from a concealed position? Once you have your firearm out and are ready to shoot, could you do so comfortably and from your normal position? Do you wear gloves and are they going to interfere with your trigger access or control? Many people have not given much thought to all of these things, let alone prepare and practice them. I know I am probably just raising more questions than really offering help, but let me offer a few tips on some things that I have learned and that have helped me.  First thanks to modern transportation lifestyles, many of us do not have to be out in the cold for very long periods at a time. I tend to dress light in most situations with usually only a top layer between my holster and me.  Sure, I carry extra clothes and back up gear in my vehicle when traveling, but for the most part, I keep it light. If you have to be in the cold or work outdoors then you might need to explore alternative methods of carry. I like to wear insulated bibs and I have a nice holster that fits comfortably on my chest inside. Of course, practicing a proper draw from any position and level of dress is also the key. Learning to sweep aside your coat or concealing garment is something that takes practice.

    There are also plenty of ways to practice and prepare for cold weather carry and shooting in the comfort of your warm domicile. Safely practice accessing your firearm while bundled up to find out what options and combinations of dress and holsters work best for you. See if you can still get into shooting stance and position and practice all of those with dry fire. Come try my virtual shooting system, and put yourself, your gear, and style of dress to the test under real life scenarios.

    Even though there are a few indoor ranges popping up around Iowa there is still no replacement for actually getting out and practicing in the cold. Our bodies’ reactions, responses and even our firearms all respond differently when the temperatures dip down. Are you sure that your gun will work reliably if it went from a warm snug holster to freezing cold and moisture?

    I hope that these are some questions and ideas to get you thinking about all the challenges that cold weather brings.  Don’t be afraid to get out there and warm up your barrels come rain, sleet, or snow.

     

    Steve Hensyel

    Hawkeye Firearms Instruction 

  • 4 Hipsters Go Shooting. The Result? Their Pre-formed Opinions on Guns Change Dramatically.

    January 20, 2015

    The popular website Buzzfeed sent four hipsters to an indoor gun range in Las Vegas. Three out of the four guys had never shot a gun before and as expected they had some pretty typical anti-gun prejudices. But in the end many of those prejudices were reversed, and all it took was a little trigger time.

    Make no mistake, there’s a lot of things in this video that made us cringe. A LOT. But the overarching point remains, when non-shooting, non-gun owning people take the time to try out shooting, their opinions almost always change.

    Unfortunately people often fear what they don’t know. And that fear leads to gun bans, restrictions, and other infringements.

    Do your part to fight ignorance, invite a non-shooter to the range with you sometime. Emphasize safety, and fun. Then explain why you believe our Second Amendment rights should not be infringed.  Find an Iowa range near you.


    Iowa Firearms Coalition is an entirely volunteer, grassroots, 2nd Amendment advocacy group. Responsible for bringing uniformity to Iowa’s Concealed Weapons Permitting process, IFC’s members work to protect and enhance 2nd Amendment rights in Iowa. An affiliate of the National Rifle Association, the IFC actively seeks to foster and promote the shooting sports. Sign up for our email list for the latest on 2nd Amendment issues in Iowa. You can support our work by becoming a member, or making a donation.

  • Firearms: A Mother’s Journey From Fear To Respect

    January 11, 2015

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    The following story demonstrates how valuable positive interactions with non-shooters can be. This true story was shared with us by Iowa Firearms Coalition member Jon Michael Van Wyk. It’s almost too easy to just write off anyone that doesn’t see exactly eye to eye with us. But often gun control supporters fear of guns – and their fear of gun owners – is born out of ignorance. Ignorance about handling guns. Ignorance about gun safety. Ignorance about all the positive experiences that so many of us enjoy on a regular basis.

    If you ever have an opportunity to take a non-shooter shooting, please make every effort take them. It will likely be one of the very best things you can do to help our cause. In the battle to protect and enhance our 2nd Amendment rights providing non-gun owners with positive firearms experiences is one of our best tools. If non-shooters have good memories of shooting and of gun owners, odds are they’ll think twice before joining the ranks of gun-control zealots.

    NRA’s 11 Tips to help new shooters succeed

     

    Firearms: A Mother’s Journey From Fear To Respect

    Jon Michael Van Wyk – Iowa Firearms Coalition member

    Ignorance breeds fear, and people fear what they do not understand. Rather than condescend to those who espouse an irrational fear of firearms, we need to make an effort to educate them so that they fear guns no longer.

    My mother’s stepfather went to prison for a gun related homicide when she was a child. Her opinion on firearms was painted with that experience into late adulthood. In spite of her fear of firearms, my mother never prevented our family from owning firearms. I had a .22 Marlin when I was 14 years old (or was it 12), and my father owned a .22 High Standard for as long as I could remember. Although silent about them, mother was also very nervous in their regard.

    As I grew into adulthood, various pistol and rifle names entered our lexicon, and while my mother never voiced an opinion in opposition, her nervous demeanor grew. There was a sort of an unwritten “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy in our home on the topic of firearms. Firearms were always out of sight from my mother.

    One Christmas several years ago, my mother agreed to pay for half of a .40 Walther P99 for my father. He was deeply moved, though my mother was far from “hands on” with the transaction. Be that as it may, it was a big step for her. Then two years ago, at the height of Obama’s threats for draconian changes to our nation’s gun laws, my mother shocked us all. She asked for a pistol for Christmas. We all nearly fell off our proverbial chairs.

    Tasked with finding an appropriate concealed carry pistol that would provide her with a positive shooting experience, we got her a 9mm Beretta Nano. It took another nine months before she would go to the range. While my mother was clearly nervous about holding her pistol for the first time, she also seemed equally curious.

    We must have spent at least an hour providing proper instruction on all of the safety rules, how to hold her pistol, dry firing to get a feel for the weight of the trigger, and how to deal with any failures that may occur. There were two other families at the pistol range while we provided mother with her briefing. The attached image shows the results of her the first magazine she cycled through her Nano. Remarkably, her aim was steady and her accuracy on par with an experienced shooter.

    At the conclusion of my mother’s first range day, we did a proper debriefing to learn if this would also be her last range day. We were happy to learn that she had a very positive experience. The following were her takeaways:

    1) Everyone at the range (half of whom we did not know) was courteous, safety conscious, and communicated effectively in the name of safety. She found this very comforting.

    2) Those playing the role of her instructors were patient, even-tempered, and were always in control while emphasizing and reiterating the safety rules.

    3) Possessing and shooting a firearm was, in effect, “demystified”. While she is still cautious around firearms, her caution comes from a position of understanding she is a novice that needs more practice. Fear has been replaced with respect.

    4) Although she has now obtained her permit to carry weapons, she is not yet comfortable doing so until she gains a level of proficiency that will help ensure proper employment of her pistol under stressful life threatening circumstances.

     


    Iowa Firearms Coalition is an entirely volunteer, grassroots, 2nd Amendment advocacy group. Responsible for bringing uniformity to Iowa’s Concealed Weapons Permitting process, IFC’s members work to protect and enhance 2nd Amendment rights in Iowa. An affiliate of the National Rifle Association, the IFC actively seeks to foster and promote the shooting sports. Sign up for our email list for the latest on 2nd Amendment issues in Iowa. You can support our work by becoming a member, or making a donation.